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being the guardian of religion justifying the presence and political will by resisting western as asian and that is it. what is your answer to the problems we have within the society? what is your social policy? what is your educational policy? we don't have answers. the only thing is polarization is reducing political discourse into something that is simplistic to. not only the arab world is falling into that trap but we in the west read this situation to these lengths and egypt is in danger. too many men are wearing head scarves now. the symbol is dynamic and you can laugh but i am sorry to tell you the media coverage is too often the case that we are reducing the reality of a country on symbols. how many women and how many men. what is your position on sharia, if you use the term is over. that is the reality of the simplistic discussion we have. but once again what i am saying to the muslim countries in the arab world you cannot blame the west to reduce the political discourse. this is what is happening in the muslim countries themselves. this is the problem. by going beyond us, pola
in politicized religion. as i described in chapter seven, of religious cranks ceased to be a minor public nuisance in this country, beginning in the 1970s and grew into a major element of the republican rank-and-file. pat robinson's strong showing in the 1988 iowa presidential caucuses signal the gradual merger of politics and religion in the party. unfortunately, at that time i underestimated the implications of what i was seeing. it did strike me as oddly humorous that a fundamentalist staff member in a congressional office was going to take time off to convert the heathen increase, a country overwhelmingly christian for almost 2000 years. i recall another point in the early 1990s when a different fundamentalist gop staffer said that dinosaur fossils were a hoax. as the mayor of legislative mechanic toiling away what i hope to be a similar president ecclesiastical calling, i did not get cd ideological impulses far different from mine were poised to capture the party of lincoln. if the american people polled more like iranians or nigerians and europeans are canadians on questions of evol
now. new first amendment -- congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or the free exercise thereof. stay out of it and leave people alone when it comes to their religion obviously assumes religion. we knew what the revisions were. the baptist convention. they were not worshiping a pulp or something. they believed in god. i am not going to revise history to pretend i grew up in a religious environment. i was going to be a priest. i believed in god, i would be enormously angry -- i am grateful for my faith and unapologetic about it. >> one interesting sort of -- it is remarkable. started talking a little bit about how we have changed over time. nevada the nineteenth amendment and women becoming part of this effort greater arc of democratic inclusion. >> and prohibition. >> which got -- [talking over each other] >> was repealed. in general most of the amendments -- what you said before. and -- we got rid of it. >> i understand. >> host: on religion it is pretty extraordinary. of the constitution freed every american to be eligible for public office. there
or hetero jenne 80, how many languages are spoken, how many religions and the extent of the space and facilities among the religions, how are natural resources distributed, generally not a good idea for all the resources to be found only in one part of a large country and things like that. i don't want to overestimate the importance of constitutions or to say here is our constitution that has really worked because no doubt there would be examples when it didn't. let me be truly heretical and say that one of the things i like about many state constitutions and you find these especially as we move west but not only in the west, is the degree to which they allow an element of direct democracy. the united states constitution was written by people who not to put too fine a point on it were fundamentally mistrustful to their core of democracy. james madison rights very proudly in the third federalist that although the constitution is ordained we the people, that will be the last time the people speak more or less directly. otherwise they will speak exclusively through elected representa
for religion. right now as you may know, justice stevens retired two years ago as a protestant on the supreme court and we now have the supreme court of six catholics and three jews. how does that happen? in some ways you could suggest that it happens but it certainly reflects is we don't see that much anymore about the accounting by religion we still force are very aware of race and ethnicity and gender, so the fact that there are now three women on the court, you know, that says something. that's approaching a kind of normalization of the notion that the women can rise to the highest ranks in the legal profession. i think we're still waiting for more diversity in the court, and race and ethnicity. but the point i actually want to make the wingback to how the court knows what it knows is until elena kagan succeeded justice stevens two years ago she had never been a judge. she came from the dean's office at harvard law school. every member of the supreme court for the first time in our history had as the last thing on their resume a seat on the federal court of appeals, and that is astonishin
myself. every man had his dope, whether it was religion, philosophy, creed, was the chemical faint -- cocaine, morphine, anything to take the weight of reality. and so we have a hero, intelligent, captivated, a renegade with little regard for right or privilege. to him the world was equally a moral above as well as the los of the progressive area reformer frederick hero. some might be squeamish about it in the criminal cases? in the course of that 60-year career he would tailor testimony, pay off witnesses and tracy tried for a jury bribing and both times barely escaped. do not the rich and powerful bribe jurors, you would as? did not intimidate and coerce judges? to the shrink from any weapons? get in -- compassion for those the faced loss or despair or persecution. a strong emotional nature doted by his upbringing. his father was a book living freethinking of their and owner of a royal furniture shop, abolitionist with steep values of liberty and equality. compassion plays a role of a unifying theory in his chaotic universe. the bids in his other office was built by overalls. poo
religions, the sense of tranquility is highly desirable. not anarchy, it is the way of the world and a healthy individual wants to see this. he is very tough-minded on the subject and i think illuminating. and he needs to sympathize with this need for wholeness. it is painful, it helps us understand why we, ourselves, and fellow citizens were fellow human beings might be drawn to the inebriation of this. i think they behave pretty well during this limit, but i want to end by saying that i accomplished working hard and playing a little bit. it was really something, you know, he never lost his wits. and he never got so much for a single visit. he never lost his way. that is something to admire. thank you. [applause] >> anyone who would like to ask a question or make a comment, and spontaneous postulation come into my life here. please step up to the microphone and talk away. >> i was curious about what you are saying about the stoicism, did he endorse that point of view in his writing? >> figure. >> he did endorse that kind of writing. florida is generally pessimistic. he believed
believe the only way you can get rowdy as the religion. rand was an atheist and one of the different answers to your question as to why she's such a polarizing character, she was an atheist and a time in american life when it was not good to be an atheist. if she were alive and writing waday nobody would care but she
religion into the public sphere and above all, reverse roe v wade in the last months again to the abortion. a big part of the revolution was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted it to work on behalf of the agenda. word the best and brightest in your group? john roberts and samuel alito. in 1985 in a memo plotting the litigation strategy of the solicitor general's office, he wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v wade? later that year of playing for a promotion, he wrote volume particularly proud of my contributions to the recent cases in which the government argued in the supreme court to the constitution doesn't protect the right to abortion, samuel alito. but, the republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either and we saw that in the nomination to the supreme court. stuart unexpectedly announced his resignation, and he had made a campaign promise that jimmy carter didn't even make in the campaign. he said if i have the chance i will nomin
and end racial preferences, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere, and above all, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution was the arrival of washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda, who were two of the best and the brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 1970 -- in 1985, a memo at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v. wade? later that year, applying for a promotion he wrote i am particularly proud of my contribution to recent cases in which the government has argued in the supreme court that the constitution does not protect the right to abortion. samuel alito then, samuel alito now. but republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either, and we saw that in reagan's nominations to the supreme court. 1981, potter stewart unexpectedly announced his resignation, and reagan had made
sterilization and the morning after pill because they consider to be an assault on their religion as this. when the president did not withdraw those regulations but, in fact, double down the, he awoke it giant in america called the roman catholic church. he is going to rue the day that he did that command of tell you why. there is a great myth in western storytelling. dates back to the eliot. the super hero who was asleep. you wonder where that super hero is. achilles will not come out because he is mad at the others. rage. he only comes out after he has been threatened. dealt with. and the room because the church basically left the field of politics in 1968 and has not been effectively energized in politics for 40 years. they are now back. they're led by cardinal timothy dolan. the ships up and down this country laypeople up and down this country, religious up and down this country who believe that the obama administration rightly has leveled a direct attack on their ability to be catholic. that is not going to pass unnoticed in states like ohio, michigan, pennsylvania where the catholic vote
the military people, they have a type of card you can imagine. did i ever say that religion matter? what color of the skin? are they male or female? are they muslims, christians -- nothing? imagine having that in your heart. that is what military people have. that is what your counterterrorism units have. because they are doing it every day, throwing themselves. [inaudible] i have so many patients now that i can hardly see them all. people can tell when you love them. when i was kicking out the door and swimming in the room, i left him with love. in closing, i want to leave you with an example of how i know love is missing. after i got divorced, i told myself i would never get married again. i would rather get shot three more times. i was a bachelor for a long time. god finally sent me the right one who convinced me that i could do something else with my life. i don't live in a bottle anymore. i don't have to take a ton of prescription medications anymore for pain. i have learned how to express myself besides just being on a team or having to do something illegal time. there's it is a lesson t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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